Focus on Australia - the woes of the wine industry & possible solutions

Molly Dooker - Carnival of Love

All of the articles below bemoan the problems faced by Australian producers.

It is sad indeed to reflect that the Australians brought good affordable wines to British supermarkets. They were pioneers in modern winemaking techniques and over the years they have shown an unerring ability to adapt and embrace new styles and techniques. Perhaps now they need to apply the same adaptability shown by some boutique wineries such as Mollydooker beyond the vineyard. My suggestions are not meant as a criticism or intended to negate the suggestions and comments highlighted in the articles below, I am simply putting forward an additional point of view. Indeed it would  be simplistic in the extreme to suggest that one course of action could ever hope to act as some kind of panacea.

The efforts of the owners of Mollydooker winery do not stop at the cellar door, they have embraced and more importantly genuinely engaged in the social media scene. I emphasise engage, because there are many companies that spend money on Facebook pages and pump out tweets with the best of them. What they don't necessarily do is to actually interact, or enter into dialogue and as such they miss the opportunity to build brand ambassadors.

In addition, Mollydooker's website is amusing and dynamic and offers users the chance to book a visit to the winery, pre-order large format bottles, buy back vintages, or order gift certificates. Of course the design and fun extends beyond the electronic world as the labels and packaging are also funky and cool.

We have all heard the spurious arguments that this sort of "gimmick" is no replacement for making a great wine and that is absolutely true. However where this argument lacks teeth is that there is absolutely no reason why you cannot make quality wine and also take an all encompassing look at the product and marketing.

I suppose the point I am making is that during the years when affordable Australian wine was making a big impact on the British wine drinking community, they did so because they took a fresh approach to wine production.

Molly Dooker - The Velvet Glove

It is absolutely right for the industry to look to expand into new overseas markets. Over and above that, perhaps Australian producers could look once again at their pioneering past, except perhaps this time look beyond the vineyard and winery as Mollydooker has done.

 

Follow the link to view the Mollydooker website

Below are introductions and links to the full articles referred to in the article

The Rise and Fall of Wines from Oz

The rise and fall of Australian Shiraz has been one of the more dramatic stories in the wine business in the past several years. And there aren’t many bright spots ahead- at least not yet.

Sales are still down by a considerable margin (save for a few pockets of growth) and wines from heralded producers like Jeffrey Grosset are no longer even imported to this country. Entire import companies like Dan Philips’ Grateful Palate have disappeared. Grateful Palate went into receivership about two years ago and Philips himself seems to have vanished.....

The Wall Street Journal

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A toast to China's thirst for wine

A RUSH of foreign investment, particularly from China, in the Australian wine sector suggests increasing confidence of a turnaround in the industry, for years struggling with oversupply and a surging currency.

Toby Langley, director with wine industry brokers Gaetjens Langley, said he had seen a distinct increase in the number of foreign investors buying Australian wine properties. "People have been looking for a couple of years, but now they're actually buying, and China is the dominant source of investment," he said....

The Australian

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This article was published on this site on the 6th March. I have republished it again due to the relevance - Vinalytics Comment

Aussie wine in China needs rethink - expert

A RUSH of foreign investment, particularly from China, in the Australian wine sector suggests increasing confidence of a turnaround in the industry, for years struggling with oversupply and a surging currency.

Toby Langley, director with wine industry brokers Gaetjens Langley, said he had seen a distinct increase in the number of foreign investors buying Australian wine properties. "People have been looking for a couple of years, but now they're actually buying, and China is the dominant source of investment," he said....

News.com.au

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